Emergencies cost extra | Seth’s Blog

Seth Godin’s Blog on marketing, tribes and respect
— Read on seths.blog/2018/08/emergencies-cost-extra/

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Seth’s Blog : On one foot

Smart phones can hobble us. They connect us, and do it with persistence, drip by drip. But they also push us to make everything fit on a very small screen for a very short time.

Teaching complicated ideas to people on a phone is like trying to teach geography to a bunch of sugared-up kids who just had a triple espresso, while they are standing on one foot being bitten by a swarm of mosquitos.

There could be a direct correlation between smart phone usage and underinformed mass behavior.

Sometimes it’s worth opening up a laptop and slowing down just a bit.

Yes, opening up a laptop might count as slowing down a bit.

Original: Seth’s Blog

Seth’s Blog: Avoiding the GIGO trap

Avoiding the GIGO trap

“Garbage in, garbage out.”

It has a nice ring to it. And engineers have long embraced it as a mantra. If you don’t put the right stuff in, don’t expect to get good results.

And so, when we banned leaded gasoline, the car industry complained that they’d never be able to make cars run well again.

And when HP started making printers for consumers, they were eager to point out that you needed to use special paper, and definitely not labels.

And if you’re using the command line on a computer, well, don’t spell anything wrong or whatever happens is your fault.

And if you’re a patient, be sure to take the precise amount of medicine, on time, and follow all the doctor’s instructions.

The thing is, “garbage in, garbage out” is lazy.

It’s lazy because it puts all the onus on the user or the environment. It lets the device off the hook, and puts the focus on the system, which, the device creator points out, is out of his control.

It’s one thing to make a sports car that runs beautifully on smooth roads, perfect tires and premium gas, but it’s a triumph of engineering to make one that runs beautifully all the time.

It’s one thing to organize the DMV so it works well when every person reads all the instructions, fills out the forms perfectly and patiently waits their turn, but it’s a generous act of customer service and organization when the system is resilient enough to work with actual human beings.

The extraordinary teacher adds value to every student, no matter what their home is like. She sees possibility and refuses to settle or blame the inputs. Isn’t that the way we’d like every professional to see the world?

You don’t need to measure the flatness of your bread to use a toaster. And the persistence of the car and printer industries means that the type of gas or the paper we use matters a whole lot less than it used to.

The better mantra is, “garbage in, gorgeous out.”

That’s what we hired you for.

Seth’s Blog: Get off the critical path

Get off the critical path

Imagine a circle of ten kids, passing the ball from one to another.

What you do when you don’t have the ball doesn’t have much impact on how fast the ball moves around. But during the moments when the ball is yours, every second you spend is a second added to the route.

That route is called the critical path. It’s the irreducible schedule, the sum total of all the required steps.

If you work on a team, part of your job is to know where the critical path is, and to know when you’re on it. The rest of your day is devoted to helping those that are on the path or getting ready for your turn.

Seth’s Blog : How far behind?

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How far behind?

Should you give up?

There are people who have read far more books than you have, and you will certainly never catch up.

Your website began with lousy traffic stats, in fact, they all do. Should you even bother?

The course you’re in–you’re a few lessons behind the leaders. Time to call it quits?

Quitting merely because you’re behind is a trap, a form of hiding that feels safe, but isn’t. The math is simple: whatever you switch to because you quit is another place you’re going to be behind as well.

It’s not a race, it’s a journey. And the team that scores first doesn’t always win.

[Opinion]

Seth’s Blog: Are You In A Hurry?

Seth Godin’s blog from 6/20/2018:

“Are you in a hurry?”

That’s what the sign at the airport cafe said.

It’s clearly a state of mind. Everyone at the airport is in one of two states: in a hurry, or killing time. The absolute number isn’t relevant–it doesn’t matter how many minutes until the flight that they’re expecting to catch. What matters is their state.

The same thing is true for someone on a commute, or a creative person at work.

You’re either in a hurry (with all the negative and positive that this state entails) or you’re not.

At the airport, people in a hurry are stressed, distracted and no more likely to make their flight.

At work, on the other hand, people in a hurry avoid getting sidetracked and (sometimes) are more likely to leap.

The two opportunities:

  1. redefine “in a hurry” to be a version of your best self. So that “hurry” isn’t a crutch, an excuse or a bane. It’s an asset.
  2. Turn on “hurry” whenever you need it, and turn it off when you don’t.

I find that  it’s not just “creative people” at work.   It is a mindset that a person carries with them through every task they are doing.  For  some,  it a product of over commitment; other people are poor planners that put themselves in this state.